FOCUS: Voting & Precinct Maps2022 Elections • Housing & Evictions • #MSWelfare Scandal • Jackson WaterAbortion •  Race & Racism • PolicingIncarceration
A rainbow flag is held aloft
MFP Voices

Safe Harbor Family Church: LGBTQ and Allies Since 1995

In 1995, 12 LGBTQ individuals came together to cultivate a safe place to worship together, founding Safe Harbor Family Church in Clinton, Miss. Almost 30 years later, the church is still “committed to justice and advocacy for the hurt, the hungry and the excluded,” Shelli Poe writes.

Read More »
Culture

Black, Gay and Authentic: Celebrating 13 Years of Living Their Truth

Duvalier Malone and his husband Dr. Adrian Mayse reflect on their collective journey in love as they celebrate 13 years together. It is also the anniversary of Malone’s first published column where he came out to the world in response to the discriminatory “Mississippi Protecting Freedom of Conscience from Government Discrimination Act” passed in 2016.

Read More »
Culture

Talamieka Brice’s Film Honors Her Children, Faces Brutal History of Race Violence

Talamieka Brice’s “A Mother’s Journey” is a film that follows her process in addressing traumas of the past in a quest to seek healing. Talamieka Brice will show “A Mother’s Journey” on Feb. 9, 2022, at noon for the Mississippi Department of Archives’ History Is Lunch series. The Smith Robertson Museum & Cultural Center will host a brief showing and Q&A with Brice and Kiese Laymon on Feb. 12, 2022, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Read More »
MFP Voices

Power of the Pen: Redeeming Language for Love and Inspiration

“The pen is mightier than the sword” is a metonymic adage created by English author Edward Bulwer-Lytton in 1839. Advikaa Anand agrees, saying that written words are a more powerful tool for communication compared to violence, and our language should be cultivated for love and inspiration, not to perpetuate profanity.

Read More »
open box of crayola crayons
MFP Voices

‘To Hate Is to Lack’: Of Racism and Raw Sienna

My wife recreated the “Clark doll test” of the 1940s, with my daughter as her only participant. In the test, children,in this case my 6-year-old, are asked to answer several questions about a white doll and a Black doll. For context, the creators use their test in testimony during the historic Brown v. Board of Education battle over school integration. My baby said that the Black doll looked like her, and that the same Black doll was both bad and ugly.

Read More »
MFP.ms

FREE
VIEW